All posts in Conference

Shifts: Photography, Environment, Action


Thursday 24 June, 6.30pm.
Friday 25 June 2021, 9.30am – 4pm.

Join us across two days for talks and discussion on Zoom, exploring the role of photography in communicating the environmental crisis and approaches to sustainable practice.
We hope to stimulate discussions about photography, radicalism and activism, including its relationship to aesthetics, sustainability and ecology, impact and reach, collectivism and voice.

Produced by NEPN with photographic artist and researcher Marjolaine Ryley.

Please contact: nepn@sunderland.ac.uk with any access requirements.

Thursday 24 June, 6.30pm.
Join us for a talk by leading cultural theorist and art historian T.J. Demos.

Chaired by Professor Mike Collier, University of Sunderland.

BOOK A TICKET FOR THE TALK BY TJ DEMOS HERE

Radical Futurisms: Insurgent Universality, Solidarity, and Worlds-to-Come

With reference to three international examples of contemporary art—those of Thirza Jean Cuthand, The Otolith Group, and Black Quantum Futurism—this short talk discusses current modelings of radical futurisms and worlds-to-come that refuse surrender to capitalist realism. Where radical imagination meets radical praxis is in the material forces of solidarity, the political form of belonging, more than ever necessary today in the collective battle against international fascisms and global neoliberalisms. While acknowledging the bankruptcy of Eurocentric universalisms, this presentation defends approaches to insurgent political formations beyond identitarian fragmentation, including a political aesthetics of abolition—ultimately of racial and colonial capitalism.

T. J. Demos is the Patricia and Rowland Rebele Endowed Chair in Art History in the Department of the History of Art and Visual Culture, at University of California, Santa Cruz, and founding Director of its Center for Creative Ecologies. Demos is the author of numerous books, including Against the Anthropocene: Visual Culture and Environment Today (Sternberg Press, 2017); Decolonizing Nature: Contemporary Art and the Politics of Ecology (Sternberg Press, 2016); The Migrant Image: The Art and Politics of Documentary During Global Crisis (Duke University Press, 2013) – winner of the College Art Association’s 2014 Frank Jewett Mather Award – and Return to the Postcolony: Spectres of Colonialism in Contemporary Art (Sternberg Press, 2013). Demos co-curated Rights of Nature: Art and Ecology in the Americas, at Nottingham Contemporary in January 2015, and organized Specters: A Ciné-Politics of Haunting, at the Reina Sofia Museum in Madrid in 2014. During 2019–21, with the Center for Creative Ecologies, and as a Getty research institute scholar, he’s working on a Mellon-funded research project, art exhibition, and book project dedicated to the questions: what comes after the end of the world, and how can we cultivate futures of social justice within capitalist ruins? His new book, Beyond the World’s End: Arts of Living at the Crossing was recently released by Duke University Press.

Friday 25th June 2021, 9.30am – 4pm.

Join us for a day of presentations and discussion with photographers and artists, Hannah Fletcher, Edd Carr, Sabina Sallis, Michele Allen and Shahidul Alam.

We aim to provoke discussion and ask questions about practice and sustainability – materials and materiality; radicalism and activism; and the role of photography and the image in visualising the environmental crisis.

There will be space for participant discussion to ask – What could sustainable photography look like? As a sector, as a practice – concepts, aesthetics, ethics and materials. What do we do next?

BOOK A TICKET FOR THE 1 DAY SYMPOSIUM HERE

Speaker bios coming soon.

This a free event or pay what you can. To make a donation, which will enable us to programme more events please click HERE.

Image: Untitled (Pollard), 2019, from The Weight of Ants in the World © Michele Allen.

Partnership event:

Plants and Protest: Or How to Grow your Art and Eat it! – Marjolaine Ryley

Dilston Physic Garden – Saturday 3 July, 1pm-5pm

Ignite your imagination into the incredible potential of plants – discover how growing and gardening can be an act of resistance, protest and hope.
First, is an introduction to artists working with living materials – with humour, innovation and insight – in areas of ecology, growing and sustainability. This includes my own practice-based PhD research – ‘A Delicious Garden’ with vegetal interspecies encounters.
Then, enjoy practical demonstrations on how to develop skills in basic growing/ horticulture.  These include – how to compost successfully (even on a small scale), getting started with veg, a guide to growing micro-greens and an introduction to plant propagation (i.e. how to make plants for free!). Some microgreens and seeds will be available to take home.

Be empowered with the knowledge and skills in horticulture – one of the most useful and hopeful gifts at this time. The session is planned to include practical demonstrations underpinned by horticultural theory – be inspired to take the first steps!

Attendance is £20 with all proceeds to Dilston Physic Garden. Booking here: https://dilstonphysicgarden.com/event/plants-and-prints/

Marjolaine is a Senior Lecturer in Photography at the University of Sunderland and a PhD researcher at Newcastle University. Her practice encompasses photography, creative writing, plant-made imagery and participatory practice to explore the horti-counterculture, politics and collaborative plant-human encounters in the vegetal world. She is currently Artist in residence at Dilston Physic Garden and has an RHS Level 2 qualification in Horticulture. She enjoys getting muddy in her experimental allotment/laboratory.

An taster on-line version of ‘Plants and Protest’ will run at lunchtime during the Photography, Environment, Action symposium on 25 June.

Image: Sorrel © Marjolaine Ryley

Futureland Now Symposium – Registration now open!

16 – 17 November 2012
Laing Art Gallery
Newcastle upon Tyne

Photographers, curators and researchers explore contemporary photographic practices and the post-industrial landscape.

The aesthetic traditions of British landscape and place are complexly remixed in contemporary visual cultures, from the pastoral vision of a green and pleasant land through to the darkly sublime satanic mills of the industrial revolution evoked in Danny Boyle’s Olympic opening ceremony. Taking our cue from such contemporary articulations, this symposium will consider how recent photographers negotiate the aesthetics and politics of place. How do photographers respond to the dramatic refocusing of Western economies in the past three decades, from manufacturing and extraction to service industries? In considering different local and global contexts, we will explore photographic landscapes where past histories haunt present experience and future possibilities, and where the (post-) industrial is variously visualised.

Our symposium will look both forwards and backwards, surveying some of the territories of new photographic landscapes that have emerged since the late 1970s, and addressing the challenges facing photographers today.  Different archaeologies of practice, place and history will be discussed, with presentations from leading practitioners, curators and academics. Futureland Now: Reflections on the Post-Industrial Landscape, featuring work by John Kippin and Chris Wainwright is at the Laing Art Gallery, Newcastle until 20 January 2013

Join us for two days of photographic debate, provocation and networking.

Friday 16 November, 6pm – 8pm: David Chandler in conversation with John Kippin and Chris Wainwright 

Saturday 17 November, 9.30am – 5pm:  Day Symposium 

Speakers include: Professor Liz Wells (lecturer and curator); Professor Jem Southam; (photographic artist and lecturer) Dr Eugenie Shinkle (writer and lecturer); Professor Mike Crang  (Geographer and Associate Dean of the Centre of Visual Arts and Cultures, Durham University) and Martin Newth (artist and curator).

Symposium organised in partnership with the University of Sunderland, University of the Arts London, University of Plymouth and Laing Art Gallery.

Registration open now.  Please click HERE to be taken to the online store to register and pay.

Early-bird rate offer until 31 October!  Fees are £20 for full event or £10 unwaged/students.   Register on or after 1 November and fees will be £30 full price, £15 unwaged/students.

Download:
Futureland Now Symposium Programme
Speaker Biographies

 

NEPN Symposium – 18 May 2012

MIchelle Sank, Untitled from 'The Submerged'

MIchelle Sank, Untitled from ‘The Submerged’

Thank you for joining us for NEPN’s  Third Annual Symposium.  You can find reports from the day from David Campbell here and Gemma Thorpe here.  Audio from the presentations is available HERE

Speakers included:  Pauline Hadaway; Bas Vroege; Michelle Sank; Anthony Luvera; Craig Ames; Ben Jones.

Dan Graham: ‘All artists are alike. They dream of doing something that’s more social, more collaborative and more real than art’. (http://artsconnected.org/collection/107477/dan-graham-beyond?print=true )

Is it possible for photographers to realise such dreams? What are the issues facing socially engaged practitioners today? Such questions seem particularly apt in our highly contested social sphere, marked in the UK by Conservative politics and seemingly intractable financial crisis coupled with savage cuts in public spending. Echoes of the 1980s are all too pervasive, with talk of (yet another) ‘lost generation’, rumour of renewed conflict in the South Atlantic, queues at petrol pumps and disarray among political parties of all persuasions. Much of this is played out across new social media contexts, where the networked photographic and video image has a seemingly new currency.

How might photographers today respond to these and other challenges? Our symposium seeks to explore some of the photographic and artistic strategies developed by current practitioners in varied contexts of social engagement, collaboration and participation.  These strategies will be explored in a series of presentations and dialogues, involving artists, curators and audiences. Among other questions, we will consider the extent to which the ‘social turn’ is paralleled in other visual and artistic practices.  What criteria should we employ to judge the effectiveness and success of socially engaged practices? How do we balance process, participation and shared ownership, alongside more conventional notions of authorship, photographic concept and creativity?  In short, the aesthetic dimensions of socially engaged practice will be a focus of our discussion and presentations, whether confrontational and disturbing or daring to explore strategies of visual pleasure and play.

Socially engaged projects have traditionally had a weak profile within the commercial photographic and art worlds. We will also consider the extent to which this may be shifting, with the renewed emphasis on experimental socially- engaged projects in the public realm on the part of commissioners and festival curators.

Join us for a day of photographic debate, provocation and networking.

Registration is now open.   Fees are just £15 or £7.50 for students and unwaged, this includes lunch and refreshments!

Venue: Mining Institute, Neville Hall, Westgate Road, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 1SE.

REGISTER HERE

Following the Symposium we will be heading down to Side Gallery where Damien Wootten will be launching his new publication ‘Northern Refuge’ supported by North East Refugee Service and published by NEPN.

More information is available in the Events section.

NEPN Symposium, 18 May 2012

Socially -Engaged Practices Today @ Mining Institute, Newcastle upon Tyne

 

Michelle Sank, Untitled from the series The Submerged, 2011

 

Speakers include:  Pauline Hadaway; Bas Vroege; Michelle Sank; Anthony Luvera; Craig Ames; Ben Jones.

Dan Graham: ‘All artists are alike. They dream of doing something that’s more social, more collaborative and more real than art’. (http://artsconnected.org/collection/107477/dan-graham-beyond?print=true )

Is it possible for photographers to realise such dreams? What are the issues facing socially engaged practitioners today? Such questions seem particularly apt in our highly contested social sphere, marked in the UK by Conservative politics and seemingly intractable financial crisis coupled with savage cuts in public spending. Echoes of the 1980s are all too pervasive, with talk of (yet another) ‘lost generation’, rumour of renewed conflict in the South Atlantic, queues at petrol pumps and disarray among political parties of all persuasions. Much of this is played out across new social media contexts, where the networked photographic and video image has a seemingly new currency.

How might photographers today respond to these and other challenges? Our symposium seeks to explore some of the photographic and artistic strategies developed by current practitioners in varied contexts of social engagement, collaboration and participation.  These strategies will be explored in a series of presentations and dialogues, involving artists, curators and audiences. Among other questions, we will consider the extent to which the ‘social turn’ is paralleled in other visual and artistic practices.  What criteria should we employ to judge the effectiveness and success of socially engaged practices? How do we balance process, participation and shared ownership, alongside more conventional notions of authorship, photographic concept and creativity?  In short, the aesthetic dimensions of socially engaged practice will be a focus of our discussion and presentations, whether confrontational and disturbing or daring to explore strategies of visual pleasure and play.

Socially engaged projects have traditionally had a weak profile within the commercial photographic and art worlds. We will also consider the extent to which this may be shifting, with the renewed emphasis on experimental socially- engaged projects in the public realm on the part of commissioners and festival curators.

Join us for a day of photographic debate, provocation and networking.

Registration is now open. Just £15 or £7.50 for students/unwaged including lunch and refreshments.  More information is available in the Events section.

Portfolio Review Day, 19 May 2012.  Information on reviewers and process is available here

The Versatile Image Conference: Concessionary rate for network members

We are delighted to be able to offer a number of concessionary places, priced at £40, for the forthcoming conference on 24-26 June 2011.

ContactSheet-001

The Versatile Image: Photography in the Era of Web 2.0 invites scholars, educators, curators, and visual artists to look closely at the current state of the novel “hypervisual” environment that we now live in and identify new avenues of research in this rapidly evolving field. Selected papers by 25 international speakers will showcase contemporary scholarship on the topic in the wider area of humanities, from art history, visual culture studies and museology, to media studies, visual anthropology and sociology, as well as art projects, individual and/or collaborative.

The conference will host panel presentations, keynote talks and forums to explore: the ontological, conceptual, technical, and aesthetic premises of photography in the era of Web 2.0; the changing use, exhibition and social value of contemporary vernacular imagery; the mutation of photographic genres and their currency in different online contexts of viewing; the blurring of the boundaries between the private and the public, and the related issues of voyeurism, exhibitionism and ethics.

Keynote speakers: David Bate (University of Westminster); Mia Fineman (Metropolitan Museum of Art); Martin Lister (University of West of England); and Julian Stallabrass (Courtauld Institute of Art).

For more information on how to book please visit:  http://tinyurl.com/4w3aq45

The Versatile Image: Photography in the Era of Web 2.0


ContactSheet-001Registration is now open for an international conference which will be held in the North East.  The Versatile Image: Photography in the Era of Web 2.0 invites scholars, educators, curators, and visual artists to look closely at the current state of the novel “hypervisual” environment that we now live in and identify new avenues of research in this rapidly evolving field. Selected papers by 25 international speakers will showcase contemporary scholarship on the topic in the wider area of humanities, from art history, visual culture studies and museology, to media studies, visual anthropology and sociology, as well as art projects, individual and/or collaborative.

The conference will host panel presentations, keynote talks and forums to explore: the ontological, conceptual, technical, and aesthetic premises of photography in the era of Web 2.0; the changing use, exhibition and social value of contemporary vernacular imagery; the mutation of photographic genres and their currency in different online contexts of viewing; the blurring of the boundaries between the private and the public, and the related issues of voyeurism, exhibitionism and ethics.

Keynote speakers: David Bate (University of Westminster); Mia Fineman (Metropolitan Museum of Art); Martin Lister (University of West of England); and Julian Stallabrass (Courtauld Institute of Art).

For more information please visit the conference website here. An early bird conference rate is available until 31st March 2011.

Symposium and Portfolio Reviews: Future of the Photo-book

Dates for your diary:

The NEPN symposium and portfolio reviews will be on Friday 15th and Saturday 16th April.

Our symposium theme this year is around photography publishing and the future of the photo- book. We’re inviting practitioners, publishers, writers and curators to talk about their experiences.  Confirmed speakers include Bruno Ceschel (www.selfpublishbehappy.com) and Gordon McDonald (Photoworks www.photoworksuk.org/).  More details coming soon.

Picture 2

Image credit: Self Publish, Be Happy at Vision 10, London, 19th November 2010

Saturday 16th April is you chance to show your portfolio to some of our invited reviewers — keep the date free!