All posts in Talks

Photographer Talk: Susan Derges


Susan Derges, Shoreline 5 October 1998 Unique dye destruction print 100.8 x 242 cm. Courtesy of Purdy Hicks Gallery

Please join us for a talk by Susan Derges on Wednesday 1 May 2019 at 6.30pm, as part of our project ‘Observe. Experiment. Archive’ which explores the connections between photography and science.

The talk will take place at The Lit & Phil, Westgate Road, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 1SE.

The talk is free however booking is requested HERE

Much of the work of Susan Derges revolves around the creation of visual metaphors exploring the relationship between the observer and the observed; the self and nature or the imagined and the ‘real’. Susan Derges is a pioneering force in camera-less photography. Characteristically, her practice has involved camera-less, lens-based, digital and reinvented photographic processes, and encompasses subject matter informed by landscape and abstraction as well as the physical and biological sciences. Derges endeavours to capture invisible scientific and natural processes, as in her current work: the continuous movement of water, the evolution of frogspawn or the cycles of the moon. She has created her work at night, working with the light of the moon and a hand-held torch to expose images directly onto light sensitive paper. Her practice reflects the work of the earliest pioneers of photography but is also very contemporary in its awareness of environmental issues and the complexity of its conceptual meanings.

Her recent photogravures revisit a particularly fertile period in which Derges shifted the studio-based, observational and experimental nature of her practice into the more expansive darkroom of the landscape itself. Despite the fragile beauty of the works, they relied on intensely physical forms of engagement, based fundamentally on the painstaking immersion of photographic paper in rivers and on the shoreline at night. The locations of the work were places she knew intimately – the River Taw as it runs through Skaigh Wood, and the bridge at Blackaton Brook that she has walked over almost every day since moving to Dartmoor in 1992.  Undertaken over the past two years, the new printmaking project has been a re-affirmation of these key works with the prints adding new depth of tone and colour to the images.

Susan Derges (born 1955, London) completed her postgraduate studies at the Slade School of Fine Art before living in Japan, where she continued her research at Tsukuba University. Her work has been exhibited in numerous international exhibitions including Shadows on the Wall: Cameraless Photography, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (2014) and Shadow Catchers, Victoria & Albert Museum (2010). Collections holding her work include Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Art Institute of Chicago; Getty Center, Los Angeles; Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Victoria & Albert Museum.

www.susanderges.co.uk

Susan Derges Spawn 2, 2018 Polymer photogravure with chine colle Special Edition of 6 72 x 39 cm framed. Courtesy of Purdy Hicks Gallery

Photographer Talk: Chrystel Lebas


Chrystel Lebas, Re-visiting Pinus silvestris [illeg.] Plate n°1245, Aviemore, Rothiemurchus, August 2012. 57°8.691’ N 3°50.304’ W

Please join us for a talk by Chrystel Lebas on Thursday 28 February at 6.30pm, as part of our project ‘Observe. Experiment. Archive’ which explores the connections between photography and science.

The talk will take place at Breeze Creatives, Bamburgh House, Market Street, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 6BH.

The talk is free however booking is requested HERE

The work of French-born photographer Chrystel Lebas examines the complexities of mankind’s relationship with nature. Through her photographic work she investigates various landscapes and sites over time, documenting and revealing the various changes brought about therein by the interaction of both man and of nature itself. Working often in limited light and utilising the ‘uncertainty of the falling darkness at twilight’, Lebas produces large format, often panoramic and enveloping images of nature at its most remote, her beautiful and enigmatic works reflecting upon ‘notions of the sublime and our relationship to nature’.

During a collaboration with London’s Natural History Museum, Lebas combined photography with film, sound-work and text in a work retracing the steps of Sir Edward James Salisbury (1886-1978), a British ecologist who was director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew in London (1943-56), who himself photographed landscapes of the British Isles. During this collaboration Lebas retraced Salisbury’s steps and the changes that had occurred since his life-time, producing a body of work that explored ‘the issues in relationships between humans, plants, and the environment in Salisbury’s time and also today’.

Chrystel Lebas is a graduate of the Royal College of Art (1997). Her photographs and films have been widely exhibited, most recently in her solo exhibition ‘Regarding Nature: Chrystel Lebas’ at Huis Marseille, Museum for Photography, Amsterdam in The Netherlands (2016-17). A selection of other galleries where she has exhibited include The Scottish National Gallery, Edinburgh (2016-17); The Photographers’ Gallery, London (2017); Maryland Art Space, Baltimore (2014); Palais des Beaux-Arts, Brussels (2012); Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art Rijeka, Croatia (2011); The Collection and Usher Gallery, Lincoln (2011); National Media Museum, Bradford (2009); Le Musée de la Chasse et de la Nature, Paris (2008); The Victoria and Albert Museum, London (2006); Nichido Contemporary Arts, Tokyo (2003) and Palais de Tokyo, Paris (1992). She has also shown her work at Paris Photo and Photo London Art Fairs.

Works by Lebas are held in several private and public collections, amongst them Huis Marseille, Museum for Photography Amsterdam; The Scottish National Gallery, The Victoria and Albert Museum; Bibliothèque Nationale Paris; The Collection and Usher Gallery, The Citigroup Private Bank and The Wilson Center for Photography. Monographs of her work include: L’espace temps-Time in Space (2003), Between Dog and Wolf (2006) and Field Studies: Walking through Landscapes and Archives, published to accompany the above mentioned exhibition at Huis Marseille Museum for Photography, Amsterdam (2017) which won the Kraszna Krausz Best Photography Book Award 2018, and also Best Dutch book design 2016. Lebas has contributed to numerous Photography and Visual Arts journals: Amongst them The New York Times TMagazine, FT Magazine,The Guardian, Source, Camera Austria, Exit and Portfolio Catalogue.

Chrystel Lebas lives and works in London, UK.

 http://www.chrystellebas.com/

 

DEVELOP Graduate Event – June 2018

 

A short overview of the DEVELOP Graduate event held in Sunderland 28-29 June 2018.

The professional development event for emerging photographers was programmed by BA and MA students from the Northern Centre of Photography at the University of Sunderland, with the support of NEPN.  Speakers: Othello De’Souza-Hartley, John Kippin, Helen McGhie, Julian Germain, George Vasey, Charlie Gregory, Hannah Starkey, Liza Dracup, Sarah Pickering.

Filmed by graduate Nat Wilkins of Canny Productions.
Supported by the University of Sunderland Development Trust, Advance HE (formerly the Higher Education Academy) and NEPN.

Wear Experimenting Artists Talk

29 November, 6-8pm Wear Experimenting Artists Talk, Mackie’s Corner, High Street, Sunderland, SR1 1TX

Since June 2018, artist Jo Howell has been delivering a participatory project with and for the people of Sunderland, commissioned by The Cultural Spring and NEPN.

Wear Experimenting has engaged over 1300 residents in a series of photographic experiments designed to observe life in the city.

Associate Artists Nicola Maxwell and Michael Davidson, Ben Freeth and Graham Patterson have been developing projects which explore the connections between their participatory and personal practice, enhancing the Wear Experimenting programme and offer for participants.  You can find details of their workshops delivered here: http://www.northeastphoto.net/?p=4577

All of these projects explore photography as a tool with which we can observe, experiment and archive life in the city.
Join us for a discussion of their work and how they engage the public in its creation.

This is a free event but capacity is limited.  Please email nepn@sunderland.ac.uk to book your place.

Photographer Talk: Hannah Starkey

Image:  Hannah Starkey, Untitled, October 1998. 1998 framed c-type print. 122 x 152 cm, 48 x 59 7/8 inches.  ©Hannah Starkey, courtesy Maureen Paley, London


Join us to hear Hannah Starkey talk about her practice, reflecting on her creative and professional development at 6.30pm on Thursday 28 June at Hope Street Xchange, Sunderland.  This talk opens the DEVELOP Graduate event 28-29 June but is open to ALL.  Booking and more info HERE.

Hannah Starkey was born in Belfast in 1971. She has received numerous awards throughout her career including the Vogue Condé Nast Award, 1997, the 3rd International Tokyo Photo Biennale’s Award for Excellence, 1999 and the St. James Group Ltd Photography Prize, 2002.
Recent solo exhibitions include Centre Culturel Irlandais, Paris, France, 2016 and Maureen Paley, London, UK, 2015, as well as previous solo exhibitions at Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York, USA, 2013, Mead Gallery, Warwick Arts Centre, Coventry, UK, 2011, Church of Light, a commission by the German Protestant Church, Frankfurt, 2010, Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin and Castello di Rivoli, Turin both in 2000 and Cornerhouse, Manchester, UK in 1999.
Hannah Starkey was invited to curate a room in History Is Now: 7 Artists Take on Britain, Hayward Gallery, London, UK and in 2014 she selected works for Magnum: One Archive, Three Views | BPB14, Part of Brighton Photo Biennale 2014, De La Warr Pavilion, Bexhill on Sea, UK.    Her work was included in Transparency, Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool, UK, Adventures of the Black Square: Abstract Art and Society 1915 – 2015, Whitechapel Gallery, London, UK, 2015, Northern Ireland: 30 Years of Photography, Belfast Exposed and The MAC, Belfast, UK.

Hannah Starkey’s photographs are represented in the collections of the Centraal Museum in Utrecht, Huis Marseille Museum for Photography in Amsterdam, Irish Museum of Modern Art in Dublin, Museo d’Arte Contemporanea Castello di Rivoli in Turin, Italy, Seattle Art Museum, Tate in London and Victoria & Albert Museum in London.
Starkey lives and works in London.   https://www.maureenpaley.com/artists/hannah-starkey?image=1

Attendance for this talk alone is £5.00 and is open to all, however you can attend the whole DEVELOP Graduate talk (including this event) for £20. You can find more information HERE

Following Hannah’s talk transport will be provided to the exhibition preview and book launch of John Kippin: ‘Based on a True Story, Works 1984 ̶ 2018′ at Northern Gallery for Contemporary Art.
The exhibition features works spanning Kippin’s forty year career and will run from 29 June ̶ 23 September 2018.

Photographer Talk: John Kippin

Join us to hear John Kippin talk about his exhibition ‘Romanitas’ and his work in greater depth on Wednesday 6 June at 6.30pm at Northern Gallery for Contemporary Art.

The event is free but booking is requested HERE

Romanitas reveals a brand new body of work created in Rome since 2012. It was made before the rise of the far-right on both sides of the Altantic, but after the austerity imposed by governments across Europe that has allowed parties such as Northern League in Italy; the Front National in France; Golden Dawn in Greece; the Freedom Party in Austria; the Party for Freedom in Holland; the Alternative for Germany, all to flourish.

In Romanitas, Kippin reflects upon both the state of contemporary politics, in relation to that what WH Auden called the “low, dishonest decade” of the 1930s. In Romanitas Kippin dwells on the image of the future built by a far-right nationalist regime that still exists, to picture the daily life lived amongst it. The work can be read as a kind of portrait of Europe in our time. Kippin’s starting point in creating the work was Winston Churchill’s famous phrase: “We shape our buildings; thereafter they shape us”.  More about the exhibition HERE

John Kippin’s artwork is represented in three of the UK’s national collections of contemporary art, having recently been acquired for the Arts Council Collection in 2018, and having works in the Victoria & Albert Museum and British Council Collection.  John Kippin’s career began in the early 1970s when he was a key figure in the co-operative of young artists who ran 2B Butler’s Wharf at Tower Bridge. In this decade he was instrumental in presenting artists’ film, performance, and installation projects in public and gaining recognition for new media in the visual arts. In the 1980s Kippin began to receive widespread recognition for his own photographic artwork, exhibiting in public venues from the Serpentine Gallery in 1981 to the Laing Art Gallery in 1989. In the 1990s he was awarded major one-person exhibitions at venues including The Photographers’ Gallery, London and his work was acquired for the permanent collections of national institutions. He also exhibited across Europe, North America and Asia. In the 2000s he undertook research residencies at places from the military base Greenham Common to the stately home Compton Verney, and published a sequence of ground-breaking artist’s books. Since then he also exhibited bodies of work at venues from BALTIC to the Imperial War Museum.

Kippin is Emeritus Professor in Photography at the University of Sunderland and is chair of the visual arts organisation Locus+.

The talk is programmed in collaboration with Northern Gallery for Contemporary Art.

 Image: John Kippin, Untitled from Romanitas, 2013-2016.

Artist Talk: Fiona Crisp

Join us to hear Fiona Crisp talk about her exhibition Material Sight, and her practice in greater depth on Wednesday 9 May at 6.30pm at Northern Gallery for Contemporary Art.

The event is free but booking is requested HERE

Fiona Crisp explores how we might encounter spaces where the frontiers of knowledge are being expanded. Material Sight is a new, large-scale commission that uses photography, moving image and sound to approach the material environments where experiments that challenge the limits of our imagination are carried out. For nearly two years Crisp has worked with three world-leading research facilities for ‘fundamental science’: Boulby Underground Laboratory, sited in the UK’s deepest working mine, Durham University’s Institute for Computational Cosmology and Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, the world’s largest underground laboratory for particle physics, housed inside a mountain in central Italy.

Material Sight runs until 13 May 2018 at Northern Gallery for Contemporary Art and will then tour to Arts Catalyst Centre for Art, Science & Technology, London from 7 June – 14 July 2018.

Fiona Crisp is an artist known for creating installations of large-scale photographs that question the presence of the photographic object as an unstable and deeply equivocal phenomenon. Her projects have been created by spending intensive periods of time in particular locations. Previous projects have included working in the Early Christian catacombs of Rome, and in a Second World War underground military hospital. Crisp studied at the Slade School of Fine Art and has exhibited both nationally and internationally. The project Material Sight has been supported by a Leverhulme Research Fellowship. Crisp’s work is held by several national collections of contemporary art, including Tate, the British Council, Arts Council and Government Art Collection. Fiona Crisp is represented by Matt’s Gallery, London.

This event has been programmed in partnership with NGCA: http://www.ngca.co.uk/ as part of our series exploring the relationship between photography, science and technology, Observe. Experiment. Archive.

Image: Fiona Crisp, Osservatorio Astronomico di Campo Imperatore, 2018.   Giclée print from colour transparency.  Image courtesy the artist and Matt’s Gallery, London.

 

DEVELOP Graduate – Professional Development Event

Image: Helen McGhie, Wanderer 2017

DEVELOP Graduate is a two-day professional development event organised by graduating students from the Northern Centre of Photography with NEPN.

The event has been co-designed to support emerging photographers and artists using photography, offering a space to think about next steps and build professional networks.

The programme comprises a keynote photographer talk by Hannah Starkey on the evening of Thursday 28 June and a full day of talks and discussion on Friday 29 June, with contributions from photographers including Liza Dracup, John Kippin, Sarah Pickering, Helen McGhie, Othello De’Souza-Hartley and Julian Germain as well as curators including George Vasey and Charlie Gregory.
You can find speaker Bios HERE.

Thursday 28 June, 6.30-9.00pm.
Photographer Talk by Hannah Starkey at Hope Street Xchange, followed by preview of the John Kippin exhibition ‘Based on a True Story, Works 1984-2018′ and book launch at Northern Gallery for Contemporary Art (free transport provided).

Friday 29 June 2018, 9.30-6pm.
Photographer talks; panel discussions offering photographer/curator perspectives on topics including:  balancing personal and commissioned projects;  building a community of practice; sustaining a creative practice.

Venue: Hope Street Xchange, Sunderland.

Advance registration is requested.  Please click here to book.

Attendance costs £20 (including both days) which is highly subsidised by the Higher Education Academy, NEPN and University of Sunderland Development Trust.

NEPN is the recipient of a national award in recognition of its work in connecting pedagogy and professional practice, engaging students of the Northern Centre of Photography with the photographic and wider cultural sector and NEPN’s offer.  The Collaborative Award for Teaching Excellence was awarded by the Higher Education Academy.

For information or any queries please email:  nepn@sunderland.ac.uk

 

 

Photographer Talk: Wendy McMurdo

Wendy McMurdo will be giving a talk about her practice on Wednesday 25 April as part of our new project Observe. Experiment. Archive which will explore the links between photography, science and technology.   The talk starts at 6.30pm in the Lecture Theatre and will be followed by a Q&A and informal conversation in the Library.

Mining Institute (Lecture Theatre), Neville Hall, Westgate Road, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 1SE.   Please book HERE.

Wendy McMurdo was born in Edinburgh where she initially trained as a painter.  She left the UK in the mid 1980s for the Pratt Institute, New York.  While studying there, she turned to photography and on returning to the UK, began to work for the first time with this medium. After completing an MA at Goldsmiths College, London, she was awarded a two-year fellowship by The Henry Moore Foundation.  These two years were to prove critical in her development and in 1993 she produced her first major solo exhibition In a Shaded Place. Working for the first time with the computer, she produced a series that explored the intersection between autographic photography and the digital image.

The rapid proliferation of computers in schools provided the context for the development of her next body of work that looked directly at the influence of computers on early years education. Working closely with local schools, she explored the role of the child within the school, the growth of the Internet and the development of networked play. In related projects, she shadowed school parties on educational visits to various local museums, a process which evolved naturally from photographing in the classroom. From this, she produced series of works that explored the ways in which children related to the museum and its objects in a world of increasing simulation.

Wendy’s work has been shown throughout Europe in exhibitions such as The Anagrammatical Body: The Body and its Photographic Condition curated by Christa Steinle and Peter Weibel for ZKM, Karlsruhe, Germany; Uncanny, curated by Urs Stahel for the Fotomuseum Wintherthur and Only Make Believe curated by Marina Warner for Compton Verney, Warwickshire, UK. In 2017, her project Indeterminate Objects (classrooms) was commissioned for The Photographers’ Gallery Media Wall in London.

In 2014 a mid-career retrospective exhibition of her work Digital Play was included as part of Generation –  25 years of contemporary art in Scotland, a nationwide programme of exhibitions and events celebrating the last 25 years of contemporary art in Scotland. This comprehensive exhibition brought together works from several of her film and photography projects.  In 2015 she was awarded a PhD by publication by the University of Westminster for her work exploring the relationship of children and photography to the computer.

https://wendymcmurdo.com/

Please note that disabled access to the Lecture Theatre is gained at the rear of the building and it is best to telephone the Mining Institute ahead on (0191) 232 2201.

 

 

Images:

Indeterminate Objects (classrooms) - Production still, 2017
From Skaters, 2009

 

 

Video of ‘Joseph Swan and Photography in Sunderland’ event

Nat Wilkins of Canny Productions produced this smashing film which gives a sense of the mood and magic of our Joseph Swan and Photography in Sunderland event which was held in February in partnership with Breeze Creatives.  Our Victorian Athenaeum evening combined ‘learning and entertainment’, with photographic talks, demonstrations of old and new photographic processes and work by photographic artists Karolina Maciagowska, Andy Martin, Lucy Carolan and Richard Glynn of The Lostness Club and students of the Northern Centre of Photography.

Most people know Joseph Swan as the inventor of the incandescent light bulb. But he was also a photography entrepreneur and businessman, with connections far and wide. We’re celebrating this story in Sunderland, the town where he was born and grew up and where he encountered photography for the first time.

The event formed part of a collaboration between Breeze Creatives and Sunderland BID who presented three events in the Athenaeum Building on Fawcett Street, Sunderland as joint-winners of Sunderland’s 10×10 project connecting cultural and commercial partners.  More on the event here